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Going to Nepal?

Check out our article in Wandering Educators logo: "Shopping for Pashmina in Kathmandu: A Complete Guide."

Our new Gesar Blanket is the perfect Travel Blanket and even better as a Meditation Shawl

Gesar in Saffron

So light, so soft, insanely comfortable!

Gesar blanket

Gesar Travel Blanket / Meditation Shawl

New Shalimar Gita

These full-surface embroidered wool shawls (not pashmina) take three to six months to produce, and we're having a tough time putting together a good inventory of them. But we do have another to post right now:

Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori

Shalimar Gita Design #7

You deserve our finest shawl: the superfine Pumori!

Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori

Our most popular shawl for the past year has been the medium-size (28"x80"), eyelash-fringe, diamond jacquard, ultra-fine weave Pumori. Astonishingly warm, yet light and scrunchable, the Pumori is perfect for breezy days, air-conditioned offices, cool summer evenings and posh evening events. In the photos just below, Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori. Fetch!

Horton models Shalimar shawl Horton models Pumori shawl Horton and Empar model  Pumori shawl

Above left: Horton at 9 weeks. Above center and right: Horton at 6 months.

Dog days are defined by the Dog Star rising. WTF?

We've heard of a rising star and Aquarius rising, but our understanding of Dog Star rising has been a big fuzzy. Or shaggy. Among the questions that dogged us as we prepared to offer our Dog Day sale (now, sadly, expired:

So we thought we should bone up a bit and share our findings.

Canis Major (with Sirius

Here are the short answers:

Digging deeper

Trying to get a hold on the meaning of Dog Days evokes an infinite regress of related topics on which we have been embarrassingly fuzzy. Here are some of our findings.

First of all, Sirius (the so-called Dog Star) is by far the brightest star in our night sky -- twice as bright as the next brightest! So it is no surprise that star watchers have been paying attention to its comings and goings for thousands of years. In fact, what we see with the naked eye is actually a binary star, comprised of the brilliant Sirius A and the rather faint "white dwarf" Sirius B. A white dwarf is a dying mid-size star, usually with the mass of our Sun tamped down to the size of our Earth. These stars no longer have the material to produce heat by fusion, but their gravitational compression is so great that they continue to produce energy in the form of heat. Eventually, a white dwarf will cool to a black dwarf, but that process is so slow that none have yet appeared in our universe. A binary star is not simply a double star (two stars that seem to be close together); there are two stars actually orbiting around their barycenter, or center of gravitational pull. The name Sirius comes from the Greek Seirios, meaning scorching or glowing, a reference to the fact that the star first appears in northern skies in late July or August.

To be clear, we've been talking about apparent brightness (which depends on distance from the observer as well as emitted energy in the visible range, as opposed to intrinsic luminosity, which is a measure of emissions, whether or not we can detect them on Earth. Sirius is perceived as the brightest star in the northern sky because it is only 8.6 light years away, whereas (for instance) Polaris (the so-called North Star) is much more luminous, but probably more than 400 light years away. Polaris, by the way, is another multiple star system, a ternary ménage-à-trois involving Polaris A (a yellow supergiant), the smaller Polaris B, and a dwarf white), dancing with a couple of other entities.

How Sirius, the Scorcher, became Canis -- or Canis Major -- is intuitively simple, although documenting the entire process would be a project beyond the scope of this minor Wikipedia search. Sirius is near the heel of the great hunter Orion, who obviously needed a dog or two. (At some point Canis Minor, the Little Dog, was noticed skulking nearby.) Orion is the subject of multiple contradictory myths, but a typical version has it that Zeus and Hermes "fathered" him. Apparently, they were wandering the Earth incognito, and a particular village refused them hospitality. Finally, on a hill above the main village, an old farming couple welcomed them. In the morning, the gods revealed themselves, flooded the wicked village and fulfilled the kindly couple's extravagant wish by pissing on a skin and burying it, instructing the couple to unearth their son nine months later. The name Orion is a Greek pun on the word for urination. Orion became a great hunter, and, according to one version of his demise, was killed by a scorpion (Scorpio) sent by Zeus's wife, who had ongoing vendettas with the various sons resulting from Zeus's dalliances with humans. Zeus of course flung his fallen son into the firmament to hunt the bull and the scorpion forever. The degenerate habit of Zeus -- and other gods -- of fraternizing with humans was theoretically highly offensive to Greek culture, which prized the stable nature of categories; from the point of view of the human consort, the aspiration to mate with a god was regarded as hybris -- a fatal disregard for one's own place in the order of things; the result of the odd coupling -- for instance, the half-bull half-god Minotaur -- was a hybrid.

Speaking of Big Dogs, our bet is that Orion's would have been similar to an Irish Wolfhound, or its close relative the Scottish Deerhound. Both are coursing hounds (bred to chase game that would not fly, go to ground, land in the water, or climb a tree: deer and boar, for instance. These "sight hounds" originated in the Middle East, and include the grayhound, Saluki, Afghan hound, Borzoi, and other speedsters. The Irish Wolfhound can be traced back to large, hairy, grayhound-type dogs that were owned by nobility thousands of years ago. S

The meaning of the rising of stars and constellations is even more abstruse than the origin of Orion. The far stars (as opposed to the planets, which were apparently mobile stars) were understood to be fixed on a clear outer sphere: the firmament. Due to the revolution of the Earth around its star, the Sun appears to be tracing a course inside that firmament, a route known as the ecliptic -- or heliacal ecliptic (from Helios, Greek for Sun). When the Sun is lined up at dawn with a given star (from the point of an Earthling), that star becomes invisible, because the star will be rising into daylight and setting before evening. But as the Sun advances along the ecliptic, one degree per day, there comes a point when the star is visible in the sky just before dawn. That is the rising of the star. Day by day, the star is visible for lengthening arcs, which after three months start shortening and taking place ever further to the west. Then the star or constellation disappears -- the cosmical setting.

The reason the stars appear to rise and fall around the ecliptic is that the Earth's axis is tilted at an angle of 23.437° off perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. As the Earth rotates, the horizon in a given location rises and falls. This causes the Sun to appear to rise and fall every day in a varying arc. Over the course of the year, that arc varies due to the changing relationship between the Sun and our tilted axis: sometimes the North Pole leans toward the sun, then the axis is broadside to the Sun, then the South Pole leans sunward, then the axis is broadside again. Effectively, from any given latitude, the Sun's ecliptic path against the firmament of stars seems to wave up and down, and this displacement over the course of the year determines which of the equatorial stars and constellations are visible.

Other news...

Travel blanket / meditation shawl

The Ling-gyi Gesar blanket (named after the Tibetan epic hero, Gesar of Ling) is 90x45 inches / 228cm x 114 cm (compared to 80x36 in./203 x95 cm for a fullsize shawl) and more than twice as heavy; the weave is a diamond jacquard, 100% top quality pashmina (cashmere). No fringes (unless requested): for the sake of durability, we are rolling and hemming the narrow ends. This is a truly luxurious wrap, comparable to some that are selling for $900+. (Really.) Our price will be in the $300 range... not sure till we actually get the various invoices. Our first batch has been woven, and dyed to the following colors:

If you would like a different color, let us know; we will be receiving another couple of batches this fall.

Nepal Notes

Seth will be presenting the ninth Sir Edmund Hillary Mountain Legacy Medal at the International Mountain Museum in Pokhara, Nepal, on December 11 this year. The presentation will be a featured event in the annual Mountain Festival, coinciding with International Mountain Day as declaring by the United Nations. If you are interested in attending or collaborating, please let us know.

.
Hillary Medal

Finally, and we mean both lastly and at long last, Empar will be returning to Nepal next year to join a climbing expedition. This one, organized by the famous climbing hero Dan Mazur of Summit Climbs, will tackle Ama Dablam, the single most photographed mountain in the Himalayas. At 22,349 ft/ 6,812 m, Ama Dablam is not among the deadly Himalayan giants, but it is not at all a trekking peak. We're not taking any commissions for recruiting participants, but there is a discount of 15% if we can put together a group of seven. If you or someone you know is inclined to undertake a real Himalayan adventure, let us know.

Ama Dablam Empar welcomed at Triathlon finish

Above, left: Ama Dablam, about 10 miles from Mt. Everest. Above, right: Keeva (left) and Horton (right) greet Empar after Cayuga Triathlon.

Still waiting?

dog day discount

Time to order!


spacer

Contact Sunrise Pashmina

Internet sales distribution office:
511 W. Green St., Ithaca, NY 14850 USA

Call us at (607) 256-0102. Night or day.
If we can't answer immediately, we'll get back to you. Soon.
Or email us at seth@sunrise-pashmina.com

support the Hillary Medal

Sunrise Pashmina has been involved with the Sir Edmund Hillary Mountain Legacy Medal from its beginnning in 2003. We are organizing the presentation of another Hillary Medal at the International Mountain Museum in Pokhara, Nepal, on December 11 (International Mountain Day) this year, and we very much need your help!

Please check out our Hillary Medal Website, and consider making a contribution:

 


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Sunrise Pashmina update
Home Shop Now! Full Menu Contact Us


Going to Nepal?

Check out our article in Wandering Educators logo: "Shopping for Pashmina in Kathmandu: A Complete Guide."

Our new Gesar Blanket:

perfect Travel Blanket, even better as a Meditation Shawl

Gesar in Saffron

So light, so soft, insanely comfortable!

Gesar blanket

Gesar Travel Blanket / Meditation Shawl

New Shalimar Gita

These full-surface embroidered wool shawls (not pashmina) take three to six months to produce, and we're having a tough time putting together a good inventory of them. But we do have another to post right now:

Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori

Shalimar Gita Design #7

You deserve our finest shawl:

the superfine Pumori!

Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori

Dog Day Excogitations

Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori

Our most popular shawl for the past year has been the medium-size (28"x80"), eyelash-fringe, diamond jacquard, ultra-fine weave Pumori. Astonishingly warm, yet light and scrunchable, the Pumori is perfect for breezy days, air-conditioned offices, cool summer evenings and posh evening events. In the photos above, Horton models a Jade Green medium-size Pumori. Fetch!

Horton models Shalimar shawl

Above: Horton at 9 weeks, models a fetching Shalimar shawl

Empar tries to weigh Horton at 6 month

Above and below:Empar tries to weigh Horton at 6 months.

Empar tries again to weigh Horton at 6 month
spacer

Dog Days are defined by the Dog Star rising. WTF?

We've heard of a rising star and Aquarius rising, but our understanding of Dog Star rising has been a big fuzzy. Or shaggy. Among the questions that dogged us:

So we thought we should bone up a bit and share our findings.

Canis Major (with Sirius at the tip of his nose)

Above: Canis Major (with Sirius at the tip of his nose)

Here are the short answers:

Digging deeper

Trying to get a hold on the meaning of Dog Days evokes an infinite regress of related topics on which we have been embarrassingly fuzzy. Here are some of our findings.

First of all, Sirius (the so-called Dog Star) is by far the brightest star in our night sky -- twice as bright as the next brightest! So it is no surprise that star watchers have been paying attention to its comings and goings for thousands of years. In fact, what we see with the naked eye is actually a binary star, comprised of the brilliant Sirius A and the rather faint "white dwarf" Sirius B. A white dwarf is a dying mid-size star, usually with the mass of our Sun tamped down to the size of our Earth. These stars no longer have the material to produce heat by fusion, but their gravitational compression is so great that they continue to produce energy in the form of heat. Eventually, a white dwarf will cool to a black dwarf, but that process is so slow that none have yet appeared in our universe. A binary star is not simply a double star (two stars that seem to be close together); there are two stars actually orbiting around their barycenter, or center of gravitational pull. The name Sirius comes from the Greek Seirios, meaning scorching or glowing, a reference to the fact that the star first appears in northern skies in late July or August.

To be clear, we've been talking about apparent brightness (which depends on distance from the observer as well as emitted energy in the visible range, as opposed to intrinsic luminosity, which is a measure of emissions, whether or not we can detect them on Earth. Sirius is perceived as the brightest star in the northern sky because it is only 8.6 light years away, whereas (for instance) Polaris (the so-called North Star) is much more luminous, but probably more than 400 light years away. Polaris, by the way, is another multiple star system, a ternary ménage-à-trois involving Polaris A (a yellow supergiant), the smaller Polaris B, and a dwarf white), dancing with a couple of other entities.

How Sirius, the Scorcher, became Canis -- or Canis Major -- is intuitively simple, although documenting the entire process would be a project beyond the scope of this minor Wikipedia search. Sirius is near the heel of the great hunter Orion, who obviously needed a dog or two. (At some point Canis Minor, the Little Dog, was noticed skulking nearby.) Orion is the subject of multiple contradictory myths, but a typical version has it that Zeus and Hermes "fathered" him. Apparently, they were wandering the Earth incognito, and a particular village refused them hospitality. Finally, on a hill above the main village, an old farming couple welcomed them. In the morning, the gods revealed themselves, flooded the wicked village and fulfilled the kindly couple's extravagant wish by pissing on a skin and burying it, instructing the couple to unearth their son nine months later. The name Orion is a Greek pun on the word for urination. Orion became a great hunter, and, according to one version of his demise, was killed by a scorpion (Scorpio) sent by Zeus's wife, who had ongoing vendettas with the various sons resulting from Zeus's dalliances with humans. Zeus of course flung his fallen son into the firmament to hunt the bull and the scorpion forever. The degenerate habit of Zeus -- and other gods -- of fraternizing with humans was theoretically highly offensive to Greek culture, which prized the stable nature of categories; from the point of view of the human consort, the aspiration to mate with a god was regarded as hybris -- a fatal disregard for one's own place in the order of things; the result of the odd coupling -- for instance, the half-bull half-god Minotaur -- was a hybrid.

Speaking of Big Dogs, our bet is that Orion's would have been similar to an Irish Wolfhound, or its close relative the Scottish Deerhound. Both are coursing hounds (bred to chase game that would not fly, go to ground, land in the water, or climb a tree: deer and boar, for instance. These "sight hounds" originated in the Middle East, and include the grayhound, Saluki, Afghan hound, Borzoi, and other speedsters. The Irish Wolfhound can be traced back to large, hairy, grayhound-type dogs that were owned by nobility thousands of years ago. S

The meaning of the rising of stars and constellations is even more abstruse than the origin of Orion. The far stars (as opposed to the planets, which were apparently mobile stars) were understood to be fixed on a clear outer sphere: the firmament. Due to the revolution of the Earth around its star, the Sun appears to be tracing a course inside that firmament, a route known as the ecliptic -- or heliacal ecliptic (from Helios, Greek for Sun). When the Sun is lined up at dawn with a given star (from the point of an Earthling), that star becomes invisible, because the star will be rising into daylight and setting before evening. But as the Sun advances along the ecliptic, one degree per day, there comes a point when the star is visible in the sky just before dawn. That is the rising of the star. Day by day, the star is visible for lengthening arcs, which after three months start shortening and taking place ever further to the west. Then the star or constellation disappears -- the cosmical setting.

The reason the stars appear to rise and fall around the ecliptic is that the Earth's axis is tilted at an angle of 23.437° off perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. As the Earth rotates, the horizon in a given location rises and falls. This causes the Sun to appear to rise and fall every day in a varying arc. Over the course of the year, that arc varies due to the changing relationship between the Sun and our tilted axis: sometimes the North Pole leans toward the sun, then the axis is broadside to the Sun, then the South Pole leans sunward, then the axis is broadside again. Effectively, from any given latitude, the Sun's ecliptic path against the firmament of stars seems to wave up and down, and this displacement over the course of the year determines which of the equatorial stars and constellations are visible.

Other news...


Travel blanket / meditation shawl

The Ling-gyi Gesar blanket (named after the Tibetan epic hero, Gesar of Ling) is 90x45 inches / 228cm x 114 cm (compared to 80x36 in./203 x95 cm for a fullsize shawl) and more than twice as heavy; the weave is a diamond jacquard, 100% top quality pashmina (cashmere). No fringes (unless requested): for the sake of durability, we are rolling and hemming the narrow ends. This is a truly luxurious wrap, comparable to some that are selling for $900+. (Really.) Our price will be in the $300 range... not sure till we actually get the various invoices. Our first batch has been woven, and dyed to the following colors:

If you would like a different color, let us know; we will be receiving another couple of batches this fall.

Nepal Notes

Seth will be presenting the ninth Sir Edmund Hillary Mountain Legacy Medal at the International Mountain Museum in Pokhara, Nepal, on December 11 this year. The presentation will be a featured event in the annual Mountain Festival, coinciding with International Mountain Day as declaring by the United Nations. If you are interested in attending or collaborating, please let us know.

.
Hillary Medal

Finally, and we mean both lastly and at long last, Empar will be returning to Nepal next year to join a climbing expedition. This one, organized by the famous climbing hero Dan Mazur of Summit Climbs, will tackle Ama Dablam, the single most photographed mountain in the Himalayas. At 22,349 ft/ 6,812 m, Ama Dablam is not among the deadly Himalayan giants, but it is not at all a trekking peak. We're not taking any commissions for recruiting participants, but there is a discount of 15% if we can put together a group of seven. If you or someone you know is inclined to undertake a real Himalayan adventure, let us know.

Ama Dablam

Above: Ama Dablam, about 10 miles from Mt. Everest.

Empar welcomed at Triathlon finish

Above: Keeva (left) and Horton (right) greet Empar after Cayuga Triathlon.

Still waiting?

dog day

Time to order!

we accept cc
Sunrise logo

Contact Sunrise Pashmina

Internet distribution office:
511 W. Green St., Ithaca, NY 14850 USA

Call us at (607) 256-0102. Night or day.
If we can't answer immediately, we'll get back to you. Soon.
Or email us at seth@sunrise-pashmina.com

 

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